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CARIBBEAT: Bikini sizzle is on the way


With temperatures in the 90s and the free Bikini Under the Bridge Launch Party coming soon, the sizzle of summer and the hot “Bikini Under the Bridge Swimwear & Active Wear” show are not far away.


An exciting and diverse group of models will be introduced at the outdoor launch affair on June 1 at Suede Lounge, 5610 Clarendon Road, Brooklyn, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.


The event is the appetizer for JRG Entertainment’s anticipated 2017 Bikini Under the Bridge show on July 9 the 26 Bridge Street event space, 26 Bridge St. in Brooklyn’s chic DUMBO section.


With a portion of the proceeds benefiting the Anne Moore MD Breast Cancer Research Fund, the July event opens with a pink-carpet walk, said veteran Guyanese-American businessman J.R. Giddings, who heads JRG Entertainment.

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The pink carpet and the donations honor his late wife, Karen Pompey Giddings.


The July swimsuit show will be followed by an after-party. Get tickets for the July show at bit.ly/butb2017 or send email to jrgbikini@gmail.com.

Participants in the 2016 Junior Carnival, presented by the West Indian American Day Carnival Association.

Participants in the 2016 Junior Carnival, presented by the West Indian American Day Carnival Association.

(Theodore Parisienne/for New York Daily News)

Costumes can take all shapes and sizes in the Junior Carnival Parade.

Costumes can take all shapes and sizes in the Junior Carnival Parade.

(Theodore Parisienne/for New York Daily News)


IT’S CARNIVAL COSTUME TIME


Celebrating its 50th anniversary and sticking to its tried-and-true initiatives, the West Indian American Day Carnival Association is presenting its annual free costume construction and design workshops to let youngsters and teens reconnect with their roots, discover Caribbean culture and show off their costume creations in a parade Sept. 2.

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The workshops — held Saturdays through June 24 at Glenwood Community Center, 5816 Farragut Road (between 58th and 59th Sts.) in Brooklyn, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. — include costume design and instruction in history and traditions.


Participants must be 7 to 16 years of age. Call the association at (718) 467-1797 for information and registration.

Dilpomats will be gathering at the UN to mark Guyana's independence anniversary.

Dilpomats will be gathering at the UN to mark Guyana’s independence anniversary.


A HAPPY 51ST TO GUYANA


Members of New York’s diplomatic community — led by Rudolph Ten-Pow, permanent representative of Guyana to the United Nations, and Guyana Consul General to New York Barbara Atherly — will be commemorating Guyana’s 51st independence in invitation-only ceremonies at the UN on Friday. The ceremonies include an honor guard procession and a cultural presentation.

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CAPLETON COMES TO TOWN


Reggae performer Capleton comes to B.B. King’s Blues Club and Grill, 237 W 42nd St., in Manhattan on Wednesday. For tickets, visit www.bbkingblues.com and call (212) 997-4144 for information.


WHEN LABOR DAY CARNIVAL MEET NEWS RADIO


The West Indian American Day Carnival Association and WCBS News Radio 88 — both celebrating 2017 as their 50th year in business — are costars of “Blimp 88? WCBS Considers Getting a Blimp,” an anniversary segment about a proposal to reach Brooklyn carnival revelers in the late 1980s using a “Goodyear-type blimp.”


Known over the years for creative, and sometimes over-the-top, promotional ideas, former WCBS Assistant News Director Bernie Gershon broached the idea of flying a blimp with News Radio 88 signage near the large West Indian American Day Carnival Parade crowds along Eastern Parkway.


In phone interview, the veteran media executive — who left News Radio in 1993, went to ABC Radio, headed ABCNews.com, Disney and now operates his own consulting and strategy firm — confirmed he was targeting the West Indian American Day Carnival Parade because on Labor Day event’s consistently large crowds.

Viewing the New York Caribbean Carnival Parade from high in the skies would be quite a sight. In the late 1980s, a news staion executive asked for a "Goodyear-type blimp" cover the West Indian American Day Carnival Association event.

Viewing the New York Caribbean Carnival Parade from high in the skies would be quite a sight. In the late 1980s, a news staion executive asked for a “Goodyear-type blimp” cover the West Indian American Day Carnival Association event.

(Todd Maisel, NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)

Copyright  2016 David Handschuh
No reproduction without written permission
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Restaurateur Jean-Georges Vongerichten, Bernie Gershon and a 40-lb. lobster for a grand affair last year planned by the veteran consultant.

(David Handschuh )


“Sometimes I came up with ideas just to throw him (the station’s controller) off track, so that when I came up with the real idea he would not think it was that crazy,” said Gershon in the radio’s “Back Stories” anniversary feature.


“We already have a helicopter” and “Bernie, you are out of your mind!” were the responses from the station controller.


But, crazy like a fox, Gershon came back a couple of weeks later with a request to buy a $200,000 satellite news truck to cover breaking news. With the lofty blimp proposal and its $15 million price tag in his recent memory, the station controller eagerly approved less expensive satellite news truck request.


And Gershon continues to think “crazy like a fox” in his company. Last year, under a “Game of Thrones” theme for a clients’ affair at international restaurateur Jean- Georges Vongerichten’s exclusive eatery in Columbus Circle, Gershon wanted created something big.


“Every course was something enormous; the first course was a 44-pound lobster. We took a photo of Jean-Georges holding this lobster,” said Gershon proudly.

Late artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (r.) and Japanese collector Yusaku Maezawa (l.) flank the untitled Basquiat artwork that Maezawa bought last week for a record-setting $110.5 million.

Late artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (r.) and Japanese collector Yusaku Maezawa (l.) flank the untitled Basquiat artwork that Maezawa bought last week for a record-setting $110.5 million.

(SOTHEBY’S, MUSEE D’ART MODERNE DE LA VILLE/EPA)


A RECORD BASQUIAT & AMERICAN SALE


Years after his death, Jean-Michel Basquiat’s legend grows. A 1982 graffiti-like painting by the late Haitian-rooted artist has made history fetching a record $110.5 million at a Sotheby’s auction of contemporary art in Manhattan last Thursday, reported The Associated Press.


“Tonight, Jean-Michel Basquiat entered the pantheon of artists whose works have commanded prices over $100 million, including Picasso, Giacometti, Bacon, and Warhol,” said Gregoire Billault, head of Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Department in New York.


Basquiat, who was born in Brooklyn, died of a drug overdose in 1988 at 27. His father was from Haiti.


The untitled artwork — depicting a face in the shape of a skull — was bought by Japanese collector and e-commerce entrepreneur Yusaku Maezawa after a 10-minute bidding war covered live on Instagram.


“When I saw this painting, I was struck with so much excitement and gratitude for my love of art,” said Maezawa, who plans to display the artwork in his museum in Chiba, Japan after loaning it to institutions and exhibitions around the world.


The previous auction record for a Basquiat work was set last May when “Untitled, 1982” sold for $57.3 million, also to Maezawa.

On June 11, the Guyanese Independence Parade and the Unity Concert will climax the Guyana Independence Celebration Committee's 2017 activities.

On June 11, the Guyanese Independence Parade and the Unity Concert will climax the Guyana Independence Celebration Committee’s 2017 activities.

(Guyana Independence Celebration )


ALL FOR GUYANA’S BIRTHDAY


The Guyana Independence Celebration Committee kicks off its Guyana independence celebration on Friday in Manhattan with a flag raising ceremony in the courtyard of the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Customs House, 1 Bowling Green, at 10 a.m. A reception and award ceremony follows at 11:30 a.m. in the Customs House rotunda.


The committee’s independence events feature a soccer tournament on June 4 at the Aviator Sports Center, Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn; an Independence Festival on June 10 at Brooklyn Rocks Night Club; a big “Mashramani in New York” Guyanese Independence Parade – on June 11 followed by the Unity Concert at Preston Court and Ralph Ave, where the parade ends.


Scheduled concert performers include Kwasi Ase Edmonson; Eddie Neblette; Jumo Primo; Adrian Dutchin; Jamaican reggae artists Kapri, Mr. Easy and Gage; and chutney singer Terry Gajraj.


For information, call (929) 263-2556 send email to info@celebrateguyanainnyc.com and visit www.celebrateguyanainnyc.com.


DEATH OF FRANKIE PAUL


Jamaican singer/musician Frankie Paul, born blind and sometimes called the “Jamaican Stevie Wonder,” died last week. He was 51.


Paul who suffered from kidney problems and other medical ailments in recent years, died Friday in University Hospital of West Indies in Kingston, according to the Jamaica Observer newspaper.


IT’S A COMMUNITY EFFORT


The Brooklyn-based Seeds in the Middle community organization is seeking apsiring students, soccer players, gardeners — and volunteers.


Students looking to enter specialized high schools can get help in a workshop on Wednesday, rom 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Youngsters from Grade 3 and up can attend the session.


Soccer players, enthusiasts and suppoters can join in the creation of the first Crown Heights Soccer League.


There’s also an effort underway to create gardens at high schools in central Brooklyn, Brownsville and Flatbush.


And there’s a need for volunteers for several initiatives.


For information in any Seeds in the Middle activity, send email to info@seedsinthemiddle.org. Like the organization Facebook: Seeds in the Middle; and on Twitter: @seedsnmiddle

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